Overglaze

Lecture: A Blaze of Colour: The Emergence of Overglaze Enamels on Porcelain in the 14th and 15th Centuries

by Rosemary Scott

7pm, Thursday, 27 September 2012
82 Cairnhill Road, Singapore 229684
Open to the Public • Free Admission

 
Overglaze enamels provide one of those interesting instances when a sophisticated technique appears to have been developed on popular stoneware and then transferred to fine porcelain. When this happened in the latter part of the Yuan dynasty, the palette of Chinese porcelain was changed forever, and the developments in the Yuan and early Ming dynasty were both innovative and highly effective.  Recent archaeology has provided much new material to help us understand these first colourful porcelains, and at the same time has encouraged us to reassess the dating of pieces in well-known collections.

 

About the Speaker: Rosemary Scott

Rosemary Scott took a degree in Chinese Art & Archaeology at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, where she went on to do postgraduate research into early Chinese lacquer and its relationship to other materials.  After leaving SOAS she joined the Burrell Collection in Glasgow as Assistant Keeper for Oriental art, becoming Deputy Keeper of the whole collection a year later.  Four years later Rosemary took up the post of Curator of the Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art, SOAS, University of London, combining the running of the museum with undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and research.  In 1995 she became the first Head of the new Museums Department at SOAS, responsible for both the David Foundation and the new Brunei Gallery.

In 1997 she joined Christie’s as Senior Academic Consultant to the international Asian Art departments.  In 2006 she became International Academic Director to the Asian Art Departments.  She undertakes research, publication and training as well organising and giving lectures, seminars and courses on Asian art.

Rosemary has curated a wide range of exhibitions and has researched and written numerous books and articles on Chinese ceramics, textiles and early lacquer.  She has travelled extensively researching and lecturing in Asia, America, Australia and Europe.